‘I Woulda Walked Out With A Drink And Chips In Hand Lmao’: Shopper Finds Credit Card Skimmer At 7-eleven



7-Eleven has made headlines in recent months after shoppers found credit card skimmers attached to their card readers. A “card skimmer” is a device that captures card information, which allows the card to be copied or used elsewhere without the owner’s consent.

In March, a TikToker went viral after exposing a card skimmer at a 7-Eleven location in McKinney, Texas. In June, another TikTok user shared a similar story, claiming that they found a card skimmer at a 7-Eleven in Springfield, Oregon. Others have reported card skimmers at 7-Eleven locations in Sweet Home, Ore., across California in places like Fresno, Daly City, Sunnyvale, and Oakland, Manchester, N.H., Baltimore, Md., and more.


Now, another 7-Eleven card skimming story has gone viral. In a video with over 39 million views, TikTok user Will (@willhunter908) says he discovered a card skimmer at a 7-Eleven location in Mill Valley, California.

“Just did it again,” he says in the video. “That’s fucking crazy.”


After Will and his friend remark upon the insanity of the situation, Will begins to walk out with the device.


“I’m going to take it. Thanks, though,” he says.

“You can’t do that,” the attendant responds.

This comment and the attendant’s demeanor have led some commenters to suspect that he had something to do with it.

“The look on his face says that it’s his,” wrote one user.

“The fact the guy said you can’t do that when you said your gonna take it, shows it’s his,” added another. “Call the cops.”

“‘You can’t take that’ lol you can’t take my card info either but here you are,” joked a third.

In another video, Will claims he found another skimmer at 7-Eleven, this time in San Rafael, California.


In a further follow-up, Will advises users on how to spot a credit card skimmer.


For this specific unit, he recommends looking at the sides to see if there is a faceplate. Other users in the comments suggested that one can simply tug on the face of the machine; if it comes off, it’s likely a skimmer.


Additional users advised using one’s phone to search for Bluetooth devices next to the skimmer, as many skimmers operate via Bluetooth (the skimmer will show up under a variety of names, they claim, but generally just a series of numbers).

Furthermore, many users state that paying by tapping the card makes it less likely for a skimmer to steal one’s information.

“The stripe transmits your info, chip and tap use single-use codes which change each time, making it virtually impossible to skim w them, a commenter shared.

“Basically use Apple Pay. It hides your real cc number and makes a temp number for that one transaction,” added a second.


Apple’s website explains that it does not provide machines with actual numbers. Rather, it uses “dynamic security codes” that function in the same way but do not allow the account to be compromised if the security code is discovered.

Local affiliate ABC7 claims that Will’s discovery was just one of several in the area.

“In the last six weeks, at least six agencies across the Bay Area have issued warnings about similar crimes,” author Amanda del Castillo writes.

In an email, a time 7-Eleven representative urged customers who may have been impacted by card skimmers to call their service line.

“7-Eleven takes allegations involving card skimmers very seriously,” they wrote. “7-Eleven inspects gas pumps and card readers regularly and cooperates closely with law enforcement regarding related investigations. Customers who believe they may be impacted should call 1-800-255-0711.”




Please don't forget to SHARE this with your friends and family.


Click here for Comments

0 commentaires :